Design of timber structures

220.00 

Najlepsza i najbardziej aktualna na rynku europejskim pozycja dotycząca projektowania konstrukcji drewnianych, oparta na Eurocod 5.

Wydawca: Swedish Wood
Format: A4
Język: angielski
Rok wydania: 2011

Opis

Chapter 1.
Introduction to design and design process

1.1. General introduction to structural design…1.1
1.2. Life phases of a building project…1.1
1.2.1. Conceptual design…1.2
1.2.2. Detailed design by verification…1.4
1.2.3. Construction…1.4
1.2.4.Inspection and maintenance…1.5
1.2.5. Demolition…1.5

1.3. Various requirements related to timber structures…1.6
1.3.1. Stakeholders…1.6
1.3.2. Requirement categories…1.6
1.3.3. Requirements set by society – Eurocodes…1.7
1.3.4. Requirements set by customers and end users…1.8

1.4. Eurocodes – general assumptions, limit states and detailed design…1.8
1.4.1. General assumptions and verifications…1.8
1.4.2. Principles for limit state design…1.10
1.4.3. Verification based on the partial safety factor method…1.11

1.5. Concepts used for the limit state design of timber and wood-based products…1.14
1.5.1. Load duration classes…1.14
1.5.2. Effect of moisture content and service classes…1.15
1.5.3. Partial factors for material properties and adjustments using various modification factors…1.15
1.5.4. Difference in material response when the loads are applied in various directions in relation to the grain orientation of timber…1.16

1.6. References

 

Chapter 2.
Structural properties of sawn timber and engineered wood products

2.1. Forestry and the production of sawn timber…2.1
2.1..1 European forestry…2.1
2.1.2. Swedish forestry…2.2
2.1.3. Production of sawn timber…2.32.2. Structure of timber…2.4

2.2.1. Material structure of wood…2.5
2.2.2. Natural characteristics of wood…2.8
2.2.2.1. Knots…2.8
2.2.2.2. Spiral grain angle…2.8
2.2.2.3. Juvenile wood…2.9
2.2.2.4. Reaction wood…2.92.3. Physical properties of wood…2.10

2.3.1. Wood and moisture…2.10
2.3.2. Shrinkage and swelling…2.11
2.3.3. Distortion of timber…2.11
2.3.4. Density…2.12

2.4. Mechanical properties of wood and timber…2.13
2.4.1. Strength and stiffness of wood…2.13
2.4.1.1. Tension parallel to the fibre direction…2.14
2.4.1.2. Tension perpendicular to the fibre direction…2.14
2.4.1.3. Compression parallel to the fibre direction…2.15
2.4.1.4. Compression perpendicular to the fibre direction…2.16
2.4.1.5. Loading in an angle to the grain direction…2.16
2.4.1.6. Shear strength…2.17
2.4.2. Strength and stiffness of structural timber…2.18
2.4.3. Influence of moisture…2.19
2.4.4. Influence of time…2.19
2.4.5. Influence of temperature…2.20
2.4.6. Influence of size…2.21
2.4.7. Long-term deformations…2.21

2.5. Strength grading…2.24
2.5.1. Relationship between strength, stiffness and other parameters…2.25
2.5.2. Machine strength grading principles…2.27
2.5.2.1. Static flat-wise bending…2.27
2.5.2.2. MOE determined from vibration…2.28
2.5.2.3. Measurement of density by radiation…2.28

2.6. Modified wood…2.29
2.6.1. Processes…2.29
2.6.2. Properties of modified wood…2.29

2.7. Engineered wood products…2.30
2.7.1. Engineered wood products based on sawn timber boards…2.30
2.7.1.1. Glued laminated timber – glulam…2.31
2.7.1.2. Cross-laminated timber – CLT…2.33
2.7.2. Engineered wood products based on veneers…2.33
2.7.2.1. Laminated veneer lumber – LVL…2.34
2.7.2.2. Plywood…2.35
2.7.3. Engineered wood products based on strands, chips or fibres…2.35
2.7.3.1. Oriented strand board – OSB…2.36
2.7.3.2. Chip, particle or fibre board…2.36
2.7.4. Built up structures – I-beams…2.36

2.8. End-user requirement on sawn timber…2.37

2.9. References

 

Chapter 3.
Design of structural timber elements in ULS

3.1. Prismatic beam elements…3.1
3.1.1. Bending and shear…3.1
3.1.2. Axial forces…3.3
3.1.3. Bearing capacity…3.4
3.1.4. Beams with holes and notches…3.6

3.2. Design of slender members…3.9
3.2.1. Column buckling….3.9
3.2.2. Combined bending and axial compression…3.11
3.2.2.1. Tension…3.3
3.2.2.2. Compression…3.4
3.2.2.3. Introduction…3.13
3.2.2.4. Theory of Elastic Stability of Beams…3.14
3.2.2.5. The approach according to EC5…3.17
3.2.2.6. Lateral behaviour with special emphasis on out-of-plane buckling…3.20
3.2.2.7. In-plane buckling…..3.21

3.2.3. Lateral Buckling…3.13

3.2.4. Buckling of frames and arches…3.19

3.3. Special timber elements…3.25
3.3.1. Tapered beams…3.26
3.3.2. Curved and pitched cambered beams…3.28
3.3.3. Design procedures…3.32
3.3.3.1. Tapered beams…3.32
3.3.3.2. Curved and pitched cambered beams…3.34

3.4. Portal frames…3.37

3.5. Arches …3.39

3.6. References

 

Chapter 4
Design of timber joints

4.1. Dowel types…4.1

4.2. Shear capacity of single dowels…4.3
4.2.1. Dowel action…4.3
4.2.2. Material parameters…4.3
4.2.2.1. Embedding strength….4.4
4.2.2.2. Yield moment…4.5

4.3. Johansen theory – timber-to-timber joints…4.6
4.3.1. Failure mode I…4.7
4.3.2. Failure mode II…4.9
4.3.3. Failure mode III…4.10
4.3.4. Design situation…4.11
4.3.5. Double shear timber-to-timber joints…4.12

4.4. Steel-to-timber joints…4.12
4.4.1. Slotted-in steel plates…4.13
4.4.2. Double shear steel-to-timber joints…4.14

4.5. Expressions for the resistance of a single dowel…4.15

4.6. Tensile capacity of single dowels – rope effect…4.18
4.6.1. Eurocode 5 application…4.18
4.6.2. Determination of tensile capacity of single fasteners…4.19
4.6.2.1. Nails…4.19
4.6.2.2. Bolts…4.20
4.6.2.3. Screws…4.20

4.7. Combined loading…4.21

4.8. Joints depending solely on tensile capacity…4.21

4.9. Brittle failure modes and group effects in dowelled joints…4.22
4.9.1. Group effect….4.22
4.9.2. Eurocode 5 application…4.23
4.9.3. Brittle failure modes in dowelled joints…4.25
4.9.3.1. Block shear failure…4.26
4.9.3.2. Plug shear failure…4.26

4.10.Forces acting at an angle to the grain…4.26

4.11. Punched metal plate fasteners…4.27

4.12. Glued joints…4.29
4.12.1. Glue characterisation…4.30
4.12.2. Glue types…4.31
4.12.3. Strength…4.31

4.13. Glued-in rods…4.32

4.14. Creating built-up column sections…4.32

4.15. Load distribution in joints…4.33
4.15.1. Elastic load distribution…4.33
4.15.2. Plastic load distribution…4.34
4.15.2.1. Upper bound for plastic resistance…4.34
4.15.2.2. Lower bound for plastic resistance…4.34

4.16. Stiffness of joints…4.35
4.17. References

 

Chapter 5.
Composite timber elements

5.1. Structural elements with full composite action…5.2
5.1.1. Glued thin webbed beams

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